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Bi-Directional Satellite Internet: Using Starband®

This is a "user experiences" presentation which discusses using Starband® to obtain broadband internet connectivity in remote locations where other options (such as xDSL or Cable) are not available.

Earlier versions of this presentation were given to the Redwood Technology Consortium in Humboldt County, and to the SHARE Inc. Summer 2003 Conference in Washington, D.C.

Bi-Directional Satellite Internet: Using Starband®


Information Technology Standards: What Are They? Why Should I Care?

Ever wonder what IT standards are? Curious as to why you should care about them and how they can impact your organization's infrastructure and applications? This presentation discusses the role standards play in IT futures, why standards sometimes conflict and why you should be interested in the various IT standards activities, together with some hints and tips on becoming involved in setting the future directions of IT.

This presentation was developed for and given to the SHARE Inc. Summer 2003 Conference in Washington, D.C. Dave Thewlis, the Principal of DCTA Inc., has been active in IT standardization for more than a decade, and from 2000-2002 served as the Chief Standards Officer for SHARE. Dave received SHARE's Distinguished Service Award for his service as Chief Standards Officer in August of 2003.

Information Technology Standards


The Future of System/390: Successes, Threats and Remedies

This paper, based in part on data from the System/390 Needs and Competencies Survey recently conducted by DCTA, discusses the current successes and future threats to the System/390 computing platform. Despite predictions to the contrary, System/390 servers are more popular than ever before and their use in new business endeavors such as e-Business is growing. The real threat to the S/390's continued success is the gradual loss of S/390-qualified IT personnel and the lack of new computer science graduates who understand large-scale production computing environments and issues. The magnitude and effect of this problem is considered and some potential remedies are suggested.

The Future of System/390



Report on the System/390 Needs and Competencies Survey

This presentation reviews the survey which was conducted in mid-1999 by DCTA, Inc. and presents findings from the survey which were used in writing The Future of System/390 paper.

Report on the System/390 Needs and Competencies Survey


The System/390 Needs and Competencies Survey



The Five Waves of Enterprise Computing:
A call to action for Enterprises, Universities and Enterprise Computing Suppliers


This paper, written and published by John Burgoyne of Burgoyne & Associates, is a companion paper to The Future of System/390 (see above) but approaches the issue from a different perspective. It assesses the successive "waves of change" that have transformed enterprise computing again and again over the last thirty-five years, and looks at the effect of the current Fifth Wave (the e-business era) and its significance and effects on the enterprises, universities and mainframe industry suppliers. The paper concludes that concerted and effective action is needed between all three to ensure the continued reliability and viability of enterprise systems in the broadest sense.

The Five Waves of Enterprise Computing



Aspects of Computer Education and S/390

This paper discusses computer education and especially computer science curricula as they relate to large-scale commercial computing (e.g. the IBM S/390 Enterprise Server), and suggests areas where substantial improvement is necessary. The underlying premise is that computer science curricula and other computer and information technology offerings available via academic institutions today are largely theoretical and/or focused on desktop or confined computing models.

While these curricula are excellent in the preparation of computer scientists they are neither intended for nor terribly successful at preparing students whose goal is to enter the workforce after graduation rather than go on to postgraduate studies. The paper does not argue that computer science curricula are wrong, simply that they are incomplete for the goals of many students, and suggests areas in which improvements might be made.

Aspects of Computer Education and S/390



Mainframes as Entry Systems

This report discusses the System/390 platform, architecture and capabilities with particular focus on the potential customer who has never before acquired a "mainframe" computer. Such customers may be entering a new business area; contemplating the expansion of existing business areas; or interested in consolidating existing work to achieve economies of scale and greater management control. Some particular focus is paid to customers in emerging marketplaces and countries and the appropriateness of the S/390 solution in those environments.

Mainframes as Entry Systems



Collaborative Computing in Standards Development

This paper was researched, developed and written for ISO/IEC JTC 1, the international standards body for information technology standards. Its purpose was to examine the requirements for and characteristics of future collaborative computing approaches to the development and deployment of standards and related materials, but it also serves as a good overview of the subject for anyone interested in understanding the issues, requirements and capabilities of an effective collaborative computing solution.

The paper reviews existing approaches, both traditional and electronic, and briefly considers their characteristics and limitations, primarily to expose the set of requirements which any effective approach towards standards development must satisfy. The requirements for a collaborative computing approach are examined in terms of general needs, technical needs, human needs, and finally the needs of the standards bodies themselves. While the paper was written over two years ago, the state of the art in collaborative computing capabilities, especially in standards-based and web-based solutions, has not substantially changed, and the paper remains a reasonably good assessment.

Collaborative Computing in Standards Development